Binge alcohol drinking trend for women


It is not just men that binge drink.  It is becoming an alarming trend among women:

Trend in women binge drinking carries deadly risks

A new study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says nearly 14 million women and girls binge drink about three times a month. The report says most female binge drinkers are 18 to 34 years old. On average, they have six drinks in one sitting about three times a month…

The CDC says excess drinking increases a woman’s risk of breast cancer, heart disease and STDs. Twenty-three thousand women and girls in the United States die each year from problems associated with binge drinking.

It is interesting to note that students that attempt to have a greater religious connection do not feel the need to drink heavily for happiness, satisfaction, etc.

The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Fact Sheet on Binge Drinking states:

According to national surveys

  • Approximately 92% of U.S. adults who drink excessively report binge drinking in the past 30 days.2
  • Although college students commonly binge drink, 70% of binge drinking episodes involve adults age 26 years and older.3
  • The prevalence of binge drinking among men is higher than the prevalence among women.4
  • Binge drinkers are 14 times more likely to report alcohol-impaired driving than non-binge drinkers.3
  • About 90% of the alcohol consumed by youth under the age of 21 in the United States is in the form of binge drinks.5
  • About 75% of the alcohol consumed by adults in the United States is in the form of binge drinks.5
  • The proportion of current drinkers that binge is highest in the 18- to 20-year-old group (51%).3

Binge drinking is associated with many health problems, including—

  • Unintentional injuries (e.g., car crashes, falls, burns, drowning).
  • Intentional injuries (e.g., firearm injuries, sexual assault, domestic violence).
  • Alcohol poisoning.
  • Sexually transmitted diseases.
  • Unintended pregnancy.
  • Children born with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders.
  • High blood pressure, stroke, and other cardiovascular diseases.
  • Liver disease.
  • Neurological damage.
  • Sexual dysfunction.
  • Poor control of diabetes. (

While light alcohol consumption (no more than one drink in a day for most people) has health benefits, excessive consumption of alcohol is dangerous.

The CDC also reports the following for its Fact Sheet on Excessive Alcohol Use and Risks to Men’s Health:

Injuries and deaths as a result of excessive alcohol use

  • Men consistently have higher rates of alcohol-related deaths and hospitalizations than women.1, 9, 10
  • Among drivers in fatal motor-vehicle traffic crashes, men are almost twice as likely as women to have been intoxicated (i.e., a blood alcohol concentration of 0.08% or greater).11
  • Excessive alcohol consumption increases aggression and, as a result, can increase the risk of physically assaulting another person.12
  • Men are more likely than women to commit suicide, and more likely to have been drinking prior to committing suicide.13, 14, 15

Reproductive Health and Sexual Function

Excessive alcohol use can interfere with testicular function and male hormone production resulting in impotence, infertility, and reduction of male secondary sex characteristics such as facial and chest hair.16, 17

Excessive alcohol use is commonly involved in sexual assault. Impaired judgment caused by alcohol may worsen the tendency of some men to mistake a women’s friendly behavior for sexual interest and misjudge their use of force. Also, alcohol use by men increases the chances of engaging in risky sexual activity including unprotected sex, sex with multiple partners, or sex with a partner at risk for sexually transmitted diseases.4


Alcohol consumption increases the risk of cancer of the mouth, throat, esophagus, liver, and colon in men.

The CDC also reports the following for its Fact Sheet on Excessive Alcohol Use and Risks to Women’s Health:

Reproductive Health

  • National surveys show that about 6 out of every 10 women of child-bearing age (i.e., aged 18–44 years) use alcohol, and slightly less than one-third of women who drink alcohol in this age group binge drink.2
  • In 2008, about 7.2% of pregnant women used alcohol.3
  • Excessive drinking may disrupt menstrual cycling and increase the risk of infertility, miscarriage, stillbirth, and premature delivery.4, 5
  • Women who binge drink are more likely to have unprotected sex and multiple sex partners. These activities increase the risks of unintended pregnancy6 and sexually transmitted diseases.7

Alcohol and Pregnancy

  • Women who drink alcohol while pregnant increase their risk of having a baby with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD). The most severe form is Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS), which causes mental retardation and birth defects.
  • FASD are completely preventable if a woman does not drink while pregnant or while she may become pregnant.
  • Studies have shown that about 1 of 20 pregnant women drank excessively before finding out they were pregnant.8 No amount of alcohol is safe to drink during pregnancy. For women who drink during pregnancy, stopping as soon as possible may lower the risk of having a child with physical, mental, or emotional problems.
  • Research suggests that women who drink alcohol while pregnant are more likely to have a baby die from Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS). This risk substantially increases if a woman binge drinks during her first trimester of pregnancy.9
  • The risk of miscarriage is also increased if a woman drinks excessively during her first trimester of pregnancy.10

Other Health Concerns

  • Liver Disease: The risk of cirrhosis and other alcohol-related liver diseases is higher for women than for men.11
  • Impact on the Brain: Excessive drinking may result in memory loss and shrinkage of the brain.12 Research suggests that women are more vulnerable than men to the brain damaging effects of excessive alcohol use, and the damage tends to appear with shorter periods of excessive drinking for women than for men.13
  • Impact on the Heart: Studies have shown that women who drink excessively are at increased risk for damage to the heart muscle than men even for women drinking at lower levels.14
  • Cancer: Alcohol consumption increases the risk of cancer of the mouth, throat, esophagus, liver, colon, and breast among women. The risk of breast cancer increases as alcohol use increases.15, 16, 17, 18
  • Sexual Assault: Binge drinking is a risk factor for sexual assault, especially among young women in college settings. Each year, about 1 in 20 college women are sexually assaulted. Research suggests that there is an increase in the risk of rape or sexual assault when both the attacker and victim have used alcohol prior to the attack.

The Bible itself condemns, not alcohol (cf. 1 Timothy 5:23; John 2:1-10), but drunkenness. And it does not limit its condemnations to those of the USA.

Notice the following:

1 Wine is a mocker, Strong drink is a brawler, And whoever is led astray by it is not wise. (Proverbs 20:1)

20 Do not mix with winebibbers, Or with gluttonous eaters of meat; 21 For the drunkard and the glutton will come to poverty, And drowsiness will clothe a man with rags. (Proverbs 23:20-21)

1 Woe to the crown of pride, to the drunkards of Ephraim, Whose glorious beauty is a fading flower Which is at the head of the verdant valleys, To those who are overcome with wine! 2 Behold, the Lord has a mighty and strong one, Like a tempest of hail and a destroying storm, Like a flood of mighty waters overflowing, Who will bring them down to the earth with His hand. 3 The crown of pride, the drunkards of Ephraim, Will be trampled underfoot; (Isaiah 28:1-3)

18 And do not be drunk with wine, in which is dissipation (Ephesians 5:18)

The partying drunkard is also specifically condemned as part of those that will not inherit the kingdom of God:

9 Do you not know that the unrighteous will not inherit the kingdom of God? Do not be deceived. Neither fornicators, nor idolaters, nor adulterers, nor homosexuals, nor sodomites, 10 nor thieves, nor covetous, nor drunkards, nor revilers, nor extortioners will inherit the kingdom of God. 11 And such were some of you. But you were washed, but you were sanctified, but you were justified in the name of the Lord Jesus and by the Spirit of our God. (1 Corinthians 6:9-11)

19 Now the works of the flesh are evident, which are: adultery, fornication, uncleanness, lewdness, 20 idolatry, sorcery, hatred, contentions, jealousies, outbursts of wrath, selfish ambitions, dissensions, heresies, 21 envy, murders, drunkenness, revelries, and the like; of which I tell you beforehand, just as I also told you in time past, that those who practice such things will not inherit the kingdom of God. (Galatians 5:19-21)

The fact that the average college binge drinker is defined as one who gets drunk doing this at least twice per month shows the lack of concern for biblical morality.

The Bible also condemns those who encourage others to drink excessively, and also hints of possible sexual violation when one does drink excessively:

5 “Woe to him who gives drink to his neighbor,
Pressing him to your bottle,
Even to make him drunk,
That you may look on his nakedness!
16 You are filled with shame instead of glory.
You also — drink!
And be exposed as uncircumcised!
The cup of the Lord’s right hand will be turned against you,
And utter shame will be on your glory. (Habakkuk 2:15-16)

The Bible teaches that those who turn from such behavior can face societal criticisms, yet avoiding what the world encourages along these lines is what Christians are supposed to do:

3 For we have spent enough of our past lifetime in doing the will of the Gentiles — when we walked in lewdness, lusts, drunkenness, revelries, drinking parties, and abominable idolatries. 4 In regard to these, they think it strange that you do not run with them in the same flood of dissipation, speaking evil of you. (1 Peter 4:3-4)

11 But now I have written to you not to keep company with anyone named a brother, who is sexually immoral, or covetous, or an idolater, or a reviler, or a drunkard, or an extortioner — not even to eat with such a person. (1 Corinthians 5:11)

13 Let us walk properly, as in the day, not in revelry and drunkenness, not in lewdness and lust, not in strife and envy. (Romans 13:13)

If you, or a loved one, has a problem with binge drinking or anything else to do with alcohol, pray about it and seek counsel.

In addition to contacting the ministry, secular sources can also be of assistance. A list of sources from the CDC can be found at Furthermore, there are groups like Alcoholics Anonymous in many other nations. People with alcohol problems can be helped. And the Bible encourages people to leave the “binge drinking” lifestyle.

Excessive binging on alcohol is serious problem in many societies. And is one that needs to be repented of–whether by males or females.

Some articles of possibly related interest may include:

The Gospel of the Kingdom of God was the Emphasis of Jesus and the Early Church Did you know that? Do you even know what the gospel of the kingdom is all about?
What Do You Mean — Repentance? Do you know what repentance is? Have you truly repented? Repented of what? Herbert W. Armstrong wrote this as a booklet on this important subject.
Anglo – America in Prophecy & the Lost Tribes of Israel Are the Americans, Canadians, English, Scottish, Welsh, Australians, Anglo (non-Dutch) Southern Africans, and New Zealanders descendants of Joseph? Where are the lost ten-tribes of Israel such as Ephraim and Manasseh? Who are the lost tribes of Israel? What will happen to Jerusalem and the Jews in Israel? Will God punish the U.S.A., Canada, United Kingdom, and other Anglo nations? Why might God allow them to be punished first?

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